The Elephant and the Sovereign: India circa 1000ce

@article{Anooshahr2018TheEA,
  title={The Elephant and the Sovereign: India circa 1000ce},
  author={Ali Anooshahr},
  journal={Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society},
  year={2018},
  volume={28},
  pages={615 - 644}
}
  • Ali Anooshahr
  • Published 1 October 2018
  • History
  • Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society
Abstract This article studies the political and symbolic importance of elephants for medieval Muslim kingship in South Asia. Specifically, the incorporation of the elephant by the Ghaznavid dynasty led to a crisis of sovereignty for early Muslim kings of South Asia. This was because while the elephant stood for divinity and sovereignty among Hindus, it represented satanic pride among Muslims. The famous Koranic chapter of “the elephant”, tells the story of a king Abraha who had tried to destroy… 
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