The Efficacy of the "BURP" Maneuver During a Difficult Laryngoscopy

@article{Takahata1997TheEO,
  title={The Efficacy of the "BURP" Maneuver During a Difficult Laryngoscopy},
  author={O. Takahata and M. Kubota and K. Mamiya and Y. Akama and T. Nozaka and H. Matsumoto and H. Ogawa},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={1997},
  volume={84},
  pages={419-421.}
}
The displacement of the larynx in the three specific directions (a) posteriorly against the cervical vertebrae, (b) superiorly as possible, and (c) slightly laterally to the right have been reported and named the "BURP" maneuver. [...] Key Method Six hundred thirty patients without obvious malformation of the head and neck participated in this study.Expand
The “BURP” maneuver improves the glottic view during laryngoscopy but remains a difficult procedure
  • T. Yu, R. Wu, +6 authors X. Jin
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of international medical research
  • 2020
TLDR
Compared with difficult laryngoscopies without the “BURP” maneuver, those with the ‘burP’ maneuver are more closely associated with difficult intubations and are more predictable. Expand
The “BURP” maneuver worsens the glottic view when applied in combination with cricoid pressure
TLDR
There is no benefit to routinely applying a modified “BURP” maneuver to the cricoid cartilage during rapid sequence induction of anesthesia, and there is no potential of protection against passive gastric regurgitation. Expand
Self-BURP maneuver in laryngoscopy in paediatric patients.
TLDR
The application of the BURP maneuver to the cricoid cartilage instead of the original site at the thyroid cartilage during rapid sequence anaesthesia induction has no protective benefit for patients. Expand
Comparison of laryngoscopic view and intubation conditions in "BURP" and "Modified BURP" maneuvers
TLDR
Findings of this study indicate that modified BURP provides better view of laryngoscopy compared to BURP, and both methods and maneuvers are equally effective regarding the success of intubation. Expand
Backward , Upward , Rightward Pressure ( BURP ) Effect Improves the Glottic View in Retrograde Light-guided Laryngoscopy for Tracheal Intubation
text, there is no statement to discuss the possible reasons why RLGL got better glottic view than direct laryngoscopy. As we know, backward, upward, rightward pressure (BURP) maneuver is a usefulExpand
Backward, upward, rightward pressure (BURP) effect improves the glottic view in retrograde light-guided laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation.
TLDR
The “BURP effect” should be considered to be the cause of improving glottis view in RLGL group. Expand
Performance of retrograde light-guided laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that optimal external laryngeal manipulation can improve the laryngoscopic view by at least one whole grade in adults and argued that a clear description for types of tracheal tubes and adjuvant use of stylet in method section would further improve the transparency of this study. Expand
The Modified Cormack-Lehane Score for the Grading of Direct Laryngoscopy: Evaluation in the Asian Population
TLDR
The Mallampati classification and thyromental distance were associated with low predictive value for difficult laryngoscopy and intubation and the MCLS better delineates the difficulty experienced during laryNGoscopy than the original Cormack-Lehane grading. Expand
Mandibular Advancement Improves the Laryngeal View during Direct Laryngoscopy Performed by Inexperienced Physicians
TLDR
Mandibular advancement improves the laryngeal view during direct laryngoscopy performed by inexperienced physicians and no statistical difference was observed between B and M with the Cormack-Lehane classification. Expand
A Grading System for Transnasal Flexible Laryngoscopy.
TLDR
This new grading system for the laryngeal view can help physicians assess the upper airways, and it can also help visualize how much of a glottic opening there is. Expand
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References

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Difficult laryngoscopy made easy with a “BURP”
  • R. Knill
  • Medicine
  • Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie
  • 1993
TLDR
In a patient with the Treacher-Collins syndrome in whom conventional laryngoscopy had proved impossible and tracheal intubation extremely difficult, this manoeuvre exposed the entire glottis and made tracheo-intubation under direct vision easy. Expand
The laryngeal lift: a method to facilitate endotracheal intubation.
TLDR
The laryngeal lift should be part of the anesthesiologists' armamentarium in helping the laryngoscopist who is faced with Grades II, III, IV, and V laryNGoscopic views to enhance visualization of the larynx and thus facilitate endotracheal intubation. Expand
Difficult laryngoscopy--the "anterior" larynx and the atlanto-occipital gap.
The atlanto-occipital distance is the major factor which limits extension of the head on the neck. It varies widely in the population at large. When the posterior tubercle of the atlas is already inExpand
What Is the Best Way to Determine Oropharyngeal Classification and Mandihular Space Length to Predict Difficult Laryngoscopy?
TLDR
These two tests, either used alone or in combination, will fail to predict a few difficult laryngoscopies but it is found that most difficult intubations could be predicted, but approximately half of those predicted to be difficult would in fact be easy. Expand
Predicting Difficult Endotracheal Intubation in Surgical Patients Scheduled for General Anesthesia: A Prospective Blind Study
TLDR
It is concluded that these three tests are of little value in predicting difficult intubation in adults, although the likelihood of an easy endotracheal intubations is high when they yield negative results. Expand
DIFFICULT LARYNGOSCOPY—THE “ANTERIOR” LARYNX AND THE ATLANTO-OCCIPITAL GAP
The atlanto—occipital distance is the major factor which limits extension of the head on the neck. It varies widely in the population at large. When the posterior tubercle of the atlas is already inExpand
A clinical sign to predict difficult tracheal intubation: a prospective study.
TLDR
A relatively simple grading system which involves preoperative ability to visualize the faucial pillars, soft palate and base of uvula was designed as a means of predicting the degree of difficulty in laryngeal exposure. Expand
Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics
TLDR
Frequency analysis suggests that, in obstetrics, the main cause of trouble is grade 3, in which the epiglottis can be seen, but not the cords, which is fairly rare, and can be helpful as part of the training before starting in the maternity department. Expand
Difficult Tracheal Intubation: A Retrospective Study
TLDR
There is a correlation between the degree of difficulty and the anatomy of the oropharynx in the same patient, and any screening test which adds to ability to predict difficulty in intubation must be welcomed, as failure to intubate can potentially lead to fatality. Expand
COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS FOR PREDICTING DIFFICULT INTUBATION
TLDR
Two methods of predicting difficult laryngos-copy were compared prospectively, preferring the Wilson risk-sum for assessment of the airway, while noting that both tests have poor sensitivities. Expand
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