The Effects of Water Temperature, Salinity, and Currents on the Survival and Distribution of the Infective Copepodid Stage of Sea Lice (Lepeophtheirus Salmonis) Originating on Atlantic Salmon Farms in the Broughton Archipelago of British Columbia, Canada

@article{Brooks2005TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Water Temperature, Salinity, and Currents on the Survival and Distribution of the Infective Copepodid Stage of Sea Lice (Lepeophtheirus Salmonis) Originating on Atlantic Salmon Farms in the Broughton Archipelago of British Columbia, Canada},
  author={Kenneth M. Brooks},
  journal={Reviews in Fisheries Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={177 - 204}
}
  • K. M. Brooks
  • Published 1 July 2005
  • Environmental Science
  • Reviews in Fisheries Science
Recent reports claim that pink salmon fry are heavily infected by Lepeoptheirus salmonis as they pass salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago. Hydrodynamic studies reveal that the top 25 to 40 m of water generally flows seaward through the archipelago under the influence of freshwater, reducing surface salinity from 15–25% from June through November of most years. Sea lice larvae do not consistently develop to an infectious stage at salinities < 30‰—providing a natural control in the… 
Recent failure to control sea louse outbreaks on salmon in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia
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It is proposed that a combination of poorly timed treatments and warm environmental conditions likely explains the outbreak of native ectoparasitic copepods in the salmon-farming region of the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia.
Fish Farms and Sea Lice Infestations of Wild Juvenile Salmon in the Broughton Archipelago—A Rebuttal to Brooks (2005)
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The modeling and empirical work to date on sea lice interactions between wild and farm salmon are consistent and point to a strong association between salmon farming and recurrent infestations of wild juvenile salmon in the Broughton Archipelago.
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The literature is synthesized to provide an understanding of how one species, the salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, can infest wild salmonids from farm sources and three-dimensional hydrographic models predicted the distribution of the planktonic salmon lice larvae best when they accounted for wind-driven surface currents and larval behaviour.
Spatial and temporal distribution of Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer) larvae in a sea loch containing Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., farms on the north-west coast of Scotland.
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There were significant temporal trends in larval densities and the stocking and harvesting of farms can possibly account for these increases and decreases, particularly at the start and at the end of the production cycle.
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The dispersal and distribution of sea louse larvae was strongly influenced by environmental conditions and larval behaviour, and lar- val diel vertical migration increased the predicted infection risk for wild salmonids.
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It is concluded that extensive use of these environmental‐based treatments to delouse salmonids on commercial farms may drive lice towards increased tolerance.
The influence of aquaculture unit proximity on the pattern of Lepeophtheirus salmonis infection of anadromous Salmo trutta populations on the isle of Skye, Scotland.
TLDR
The results highlight the complexity of the relationship between S. trutta and L. salmonis infections on wild fish and emphasize the requirement of further research to quantify these effects to better inform conservation and management strategies, particularly in areas of active S. salar farm facilities.
Considerations in developing an integrated pest management programme for control of sea lice on farmed salmon in Pacific Canada.
  • K. M. Brooks
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    Journal of fish diseases
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Recommendations for developing an IPM plan specific to the Broughton Archipelago are provided along with a discussion of the additional information needed to refine IPM plans in this and other areas.
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