The Effects of National Culture and Face Concerns on Intention to Apologize: A Comparison of the USA and China

@article{SunPark2006TheEO,
  title={The Effects of National Culture and Face Concerns on Intention to Apologize: A Comparison of the USA and China},
  author={Hee Sun Park and Xiaowen Guan},
  journal={Journal of Intercultural Communication Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={35},
  pages={183 - 204}
}
The current study examined national culture differences between US American and Chinese participants (N = 317) regarding face need concerns and apology intention, based on positive and negative face needs (Brown & Levinson, 1987) and concerns for self-face and other-face (Ting-Toomey, 2005). Participants read vignettes that varied in relationship types (in-group vs. out-group members) and situation types (negative face vs. positive face threatening) and responded to scales measuring realism of… 

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