The Effects of Mortality, Subsistence, and Ecology on Human Adult Height and Implications for Homo Evolution

@article{Migliano2012TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Mortality, Subsistence, and Ecology on Human Adult Height and Implications for Homo Evolution},
  author={Andrea Bamberg Migliano and Myrtille Guillon},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2012},
  volume={53},
  pages={S359 - S368}
}
The increase in body size observed with the appearance and evolution of Homo is most often attributed to thermoregulatory and locomotor adaptations to environment; increased reliance on animal protein and fat; or increased behavioral flexibility, provisioning, and cooperation leading to decreased mortality rates and slow life histories. It is not easy to test these hypotheses in the fossil record. Therefore, understanding selective pressures shaping height variability in living humans might… 
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