The Effects of High Protein Diets on Thermogenesis, Satiety and Weight Loss: A Critical Review

@article{Halton2004TheEO,
  title={The Effects of High Protein Diets on Thermogenesis, Satiety and Weight Loss: A Critical Review},
  author={Thomas L Halton and Frank B. Hu},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={373 - 385}
}
  • T. Halton, F. Hu
  • Published 1 October 2004
  • Biology
  • Journal of the American College of Nutrition
For years, proponents of some fad diets have claimed that higher amounts of protein facilitate weight loss. [] Key Method In this study, we conducted a systematic review of randomized investigations on the effects of high protein diets on dietary thermogenesis, satiety, body weight and fat loss. There is convincing evidence that a higher protein intake increases thermogenesis and satiety compared to diets of lower protein content. The weight of evidence also suggests that high protein meals lead to a reduced…
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