Corpus ID: 148538214

The Effects of Gender Stereotypes, In/Out Systems, and System Justification in Women

@inproceedings{Rotella2009TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Gender Stereotypes, In/Out Systems, and System Justification in Women},
  author={K. Rotella},
  year={2009}
}
Complementary stereotypes appear to praise a group, but inherently contain a negative stereotype (“women are better team-players” implies women are poor leaders). Exposure to these stereotypes tends to increase women’s support of the social status quo even as women continue to be socially disadvantaged—System Justification Theory (SJT) posits that this is due to a motivation to believe we live in a just society. This study explores whether or not SJT holds when complementary stereotypes are… Expand

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