The Effects of Estrogen on Theiler’s Virus Infection of Endothelial Cells

Abstract

The Effects of Estrogen on Theiler’s Virus Infection of Endothelial Cells. (April 2009) Steven M. Maher Department of Biomedical Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Jane Welsh Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The pathogenesis of this disease is not fully understood, but it is thought to be triggered by viral infection during early adulthood and is followed by autoimmunemediated demyelination. Sex hormones are involved in the pathogenesis of MS since during pregnancy, women with MS undergo remission of the disease. Our laboratory uses Theiler’s virus-induced demyelination (TVID) as the animal model for studying MS. Theiler’s virus is a naturally occurring pathogen of mice, which causes an autoimmune-mediated demyelination of the central nervous system resulting in inflammatory lesions with similarities to human MS. In the current study we examined the effects of estrogen on Theiler’s virus infection of cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB): cerebral vascular endothelial (CVE) cells in vitro. The hypotheses to be tested were that (1) estrogen would have a protective effect on the CVE cells and that (2) estrogen treatment would alter the expression of microRNAs. Cloned CVE cells from BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice were used in these experiments, which remain diploid and

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Maher2009TheEO, title={The Effects of Estrogen on Theiler’s Virus Infection of Endothelial Cells}, author={Steven M. Maher and Jane R. Welsh and Robert Clinton Webb}, year={2009} }