The Effects of Domestic Violence During Pregnancy on Maternal and Infant Health

@article{HuthBocks2002TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Domestic Violence During Pregnancy on Maternal and Infant Health},
  author={Alissa C Huth-Bocks and Alytia Akiko Levendosky and G Anne Bogat},
  journal={Violence and Victims},
  year={2002},
  volume={17},
  pages={169 - 185}
}
The present study examined the impact of domestic violence on maternal and infant health by assessing maternal health during pregnancy and infant health at two months postpartum. Two hundred and two women (68 battered and 134 non-battered) were recruited from the community and completed both pregnancy and 2-month postpartum interviews. Results revealed that domestic violence during pregnancy was associated with numerous health problems for mothers and infants including more health problems… Expand

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