The Effects of Canvassing, Telephone Calls, and Direct Mail on Voter Turnout: A Field Experiment

@article{Gerber2000TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Canvassing, Telephone Calls, and Direct Mail on Voter Turnout: A Field Experiment},
  author={A. Gerber and D. Green},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={2000},
  volume={94},
  pages={653-663}
}
  • A. Gerber, D. Green
  • Published 2000
  • Sociology
  • American Political Science Review
  • We report the results of a randomized field experiment involving approximately 30,000 registered voters in New Haven, Connecticut. Nonpartisan get-out-the-vote messages were conveyed through personal canvassing, direct mail, and telephone calls shortly before the November 1998 election. A variety of substantive messages were used. Voter turnout was increased substantially by personal canvassing, slightly by direct mail, and not at all by telephone calls. These findings support our hypothesis… CONTINUE READING
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