The Effects of Caffeine on Sleep in Drosophila Require PKA Activity, But Not the Adenosine Receptor

@article{Wu2009TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Caffeine on Sleep in Drosophila Require PKA Activity, But Not the Adenosine Receptor},
  author={Mark N Wu and Karen S Ho and A. Crocker and Zhifeng Yue and K. Koh and A. Sehgal},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2009},
  volume={29},
  pages={11029 - 11037}
}
Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed stimulants in the world and has been proposed to promote wakefulness by antagonizing function of the adenosine A2A receptor. Here, we show that chronic administration of caffeine reduces and fragments sleep in Drosophila and also lengthens circadian period. To identify the mechanisms underlying these effects of caffeine, we first generated mutants of the only known adenosine receptor in flies (dAdoR), which by sequence is most similar to the mammalian… Expand
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