The Effects of Automobile Safety Regulation

@article{Peltzman1975TheEO,
  title={The Effects of Automobile Safety Regulation},
  author={Sam Peltzman},
  journal={Journal of Political Economy},
  year={1975},
  volume={83},
  pages={677 - 725}
}
  • S. Peltzman
  • Published 1 August 1975
  • Economics
  • Journal of Political Economy
Technological studies imply that annual highway deaths would be 20 percent greater without legally mandated installation of various safety devices on automobiles. However, this literature ignores offsetting effects of nonregulatory demand for safety and driver response to the devices. This article indicates that these offsets are virtually complete, so that regulation has not decreased highway deaths. Time-series (but not cross-section) data imply some saving of auto occupants' lives at the… 
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