The Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Survival of People Receiving Care for HIV Infection in the United States

@article{Cunningham2005TheEO,
  title={The Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Survival of People Receiving Care for HIV Infection in the United States},
  author={William E. Cunningham and Ron D. Hays and Naihua Duan and Ronald M. Andersen and Terry T. Nakazono and Samuel A. Bozzette and Martin F. Shapiro},
  journal={Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={655 - 676}
}
HIV-infected people with low socioeconomic status (SES) and people who are members of a racial or ethnic minority have been found to receive fewer services, including treatment with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), than others. We examined whether these groups also have worse survival than others and the degree to which service use and antiretroviral medications explain these disparities in a prospective cohort study of a national probability sample of 2,864 adults receiving HIV… 

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