The Effect of Red on Avoidance Behavior in Achievement Contexts

@article{Elliot2009TheEO,
  title={The Effect of Red on Avoidance Behavior in Achievement Contexts},
  author={A. Elliot and M. Maier and M. Binser and Ron Friedman and R. Pekrun},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2009},
  volume={35},
  pages={365 - 375}
}
  • A. Elliot, M. Maier, +2 authors R. Pekrun
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
  • This research tests whether the perception of red in an achievement context evokes avoidance behavior without conscious awareness and also examines the context specificity of the hypothesized red effect. In Experiment 1, participants were briefly shown red or green on the cover of an analogies test that they would ostensibly take (an achievement context) or rate on likability of (a nonachievement context) in an adjacent lab. Those shown red, relative to those shown green, knocked fewer times on… CONTINUE READING
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