• Corpus ID: 36119522

The Effect of Honey Consumption Compared with Sucrose on Blood Pressure and Fasting Blood Glucose in Healthy Young Subjects

@inproceedings{Rasad2014TheEO,
  title={The Effect of Honey Consumption Compared with Sucrose on Blood Pressure and Fasting Blood Glucose in Healthy Young Subjects},
  author={Hamid Rasad and Arash Dashtabi and Marzieh Khansari and Fakhredin Chaboksavar and Naseh Pahlavani and Zahra Maghsoudi and Mohammad H. Entezari},
  year={2014}
}
Background : Several studies have shown that honey consumption can have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease indicators. This study aimed to assess the effect of honey consumption compared with sucrose on fasting blood glucose and blood pressure among young healthy subjects. Methods : Sixty healthy subjects, aged 18 to 30 years, enrolled to this double blind randomized trial for one month. Participants assigned randomly to honey (received 70 gram honey per day) and sucrose (received 70… 

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