The Effect of Daily Treatment with an Olive Oil/Lanolin Emollient on Skin Integrity in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

@article{KiechlKohlendorfer2008TheEO,
  title={The Effect of Daily Treatment with an Olive Oil/Lanolin Emollient on Skin Integrity in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial},
  author={Ursula Kiechl‐Kohlendorfer and Cindy Berger and Romy Inzinger},
  journal={Pediatric Dermatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={25}
}
Abstract:  To date, appropriate skin therapy for premature infants has not been clearly defined. Emollient creams are often used without solid evidence for a benefit to the neonate. The aim of the current study was to investigate the cutaneous effects of two different topical ointment therapies. Between October 2004 and November 2006 we prospectively enrolled 173 infants between 25 and 36 weeks of gestation admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. Infants were randomly assigned to daily… 
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TLDR
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Topical use of olive oil preparation to prevent radiodermatitis: results of a prospective study in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.
TLDR
The results of this trial indicate that olive oil holds promise as a safe and effective prophylactic treatment for radiodermatitis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
Question 2: Are natural plant oils the best topical agents to use on baby skin?
While completing a baby check on a healthy 2-day-old, a parent asks you about some areas of dry, cracked and flaky skin they have noticed on their infant. They have heard that natural plant oils are
The foundation for the use of olive oil in skin care and botanical cosmeceuticals
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Olive oil is currently used in topical applications for the treatment of several skin conditions, including dry skin, itch, and inflammation as well as disorders such as rosacea.
A pilot study of emollient therapy for the primary prevention of atopic dermatitis.
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Skin barrier repair from birth represents a novel and feasible approach to AD prevention and further studies are warranted to determine the efficacy of this approach.
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