The Effect of Concealed Weapons Laws: An Extreme Bound Analysis

@article{Bartley1998TheEO,
  title={The Effect of Concealed Weapons Laws: An Extreme Bound Analysis},
  author={William Alan Bartley and Mark A. Cohen},
  journal={Economic Inquiry},
  year={1998},
  volume={36},
  pages={258-265}
}
John R. Lott and David B. Mustard (1997} provide evidence that enactment of concealed handgun ('right-to-carry') laws deters violent crime and induces substitution into property crime. A critique by Dan A. Black and Daniel S. Nagin (1998) questions the particular model specification used in the empirical analysis. In this paper, the authors estimate the 'model uncertainty' surrounding the model specified by Lott and Mustard using an extreme bound analysis (Edward Leamer 1983). They find that… Expand

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References

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Dan A. Black and Daniel S. Nagin state that my article with David Mustard assumes that the effect of concealed-handgun laws is constant over time, that the effect is the same across states, that theExpand
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John R. Lott and David B. Mustard conclude that right‐to‐carry laws deter violent crime. Our reanalysis of Lott and Mustard's data provides no basis for drawing confident conclusions about the impactExpand
Sensitivity Analyses of the Deterrence Hypothesis: Let's Keep the Econ in Econometrics
Leamer and McManus applied Extreme Bound Analysis (EBA) in an empirical study of the deterrent effects of capital punishment and other penalties. Their analysis has questioned the validity of theExpand
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Using cross‐sectional time‐series data for U.S. counties from 1977 to 1992, we find that allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons deters violent crimes, without increasing accidental deaths. IfExpand
Sensitivity Analyses Would Help
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The paper begins with the question of whether Leamer's Extreme Bounds Analysis (EBA) really does "Take the Con Out of Econometrics" By analytically demonstrating that the extreme bounds are simplyExpand
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The Concealed Handgun Debate.”Journal ofLegalStudies, January 1998.22143
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