The Ecosystem Engineer Crassostrea gigas Affects Tidal Flat Morphology Beyond the Boundary of Their Reef Structures

@article{Walles2014TheEE,
  title={The Ecosystem Engineer Crassostrea gigas Affects Tidal Flat Morphology Beyond the Boundary of Their Reef Structures},
  author={Brenda Walles and Jo{\~a}o Salvador de Paiva and Bram C. Prooijen and T. J. Ysebaert and Aad C. Smaal},
  journal={Estuaries and Coasts},
  year={2014},
  volume={38},
  pages={941-950}
}
Ecosystem engineers that inhabit coastal and estuarine environments, such as reef building oysters, do not only stabilise the sediment within their reefs, but their influence might also extend far outside their reefs, affecting tidal flat morphology and protecting the surrounding soft-sediment environment against erosion. However, quantitative information is largely missing, and the spatially extended ecosystem engineering effects on the surrounding soft-sediment largely unstudied. To quantify… 
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