Corpus ID: 16257266

The Economics of Shadow Banking

@inproceedings{Singh2013TheEO,
  title={The Economics of Shadow Banking},
  author={Manmohan Singh},
  year={2013}
}
The past decade has witnessed rapid growth in financial intermediation that involves interaction between banks and non-banks. Coined under the rubric of ‘shadow banking’ the nexus between banks and non-banks is largely seen as a form of regulatory arbitrage. However, this is an incomplete view since there is genuine economic demand for these services. This paper attempts to explain the economics that support the demand for and supply of services in this market, the systemic risks that can arise… Expand

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