The Economic Integration of Forced Migrants: Evidence for Post�?War Germany

@article{Bauer2011TheEI,
  title={The Economic Integration of Forced Migrants: Evidence for Post�?War Germany},
  author={Thomas K. Bauer and Sebastian Till Braun and Michal Kvasni{\vc}ka},
  journal={European Economics: Labor \& Social Conditions eJournal},
  year={2011}
}
The flight and expulsion of Germans from Eastern Europe during and after World War II constitutes one of the largest forced population movements in history. We analyze the economic integration of these forced migrants and their offspring in West Germany. The empirical results suggest that even a quarter of a century after displacement, first generation migrants and native West Germans that were comparable before the war perform strikingly different. Migrants have substantially lower incomes and… Expand
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