The Ecological Significance of Tool Use in New Caledonian Crows

@article{Rutz2010TheES,
  title={The Ecological Significance of Tool Use in New Caledonian Crows},
  author={Christian Rutz and Lucas A. Bluff and Nicola Reed and Jolyon Troscianko and Jason Newton and Richard Inger and Alex Kacelnik and Stuart Bearhop},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={329},
  pages={1523 - 1526}
}
Clever Crows Understanding the adaptive significance of animal tool use requires reliable information on the foraging behavior in the wild. New Caledonian crows consume a range of foods and use sticks as tools to extract wood-boring beetle larvae from their burrows. These larvae, with their unusual diet, have a distinct isotopic signature that can be traced after consumption by the crows in the crows' feathers and blood. By comparing the stable isotope profiles of crows' tissues with those of… Expand
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It is suggested that a common ancestor of NC crows, originating from a (probably) non-tool-using South-East Asian or Australasian crow population, colonised New Caledonia after its last emersion several million years ago, and may have influenced the evolution of at least some of the species' tool-oriented behaviours. Expand
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What New Caledonian crows do with their tools between successive prey extractions is experimentally investigated, and whether they express tool ‘safekeeping’ behaviours more often when the costs (foraging at height), or likelihood, of tool loss are high. Expand
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It is found that New Caledonian crows have one of the longest known periods of regular extended parental provisioning in birds, and the possibility that these two characteristics might be causally related is raised. Expand
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It is suggested that the resulting delayed natal dispersal drives population-divergence patterns in this species, and provides essential context for future studies that examine the genetic makeup of crow populations across larger geographic areas, including localities with suspected cultural differences in crow tool technologies. Expand
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  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2013
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It is concluded that chimpanzees in the Goualougo Triangle use a sophisticated tool technology to cope with seasonal changes in relative food abundance and gain access to high-quality foods. Expand
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Video recordings of New Caledonian crows reveal an ‘expanded’ foraging niche for hooked stick tools, and highlight more generally how crows routinely switch between tool- and bill-assisted foraging. Expand
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Tool use by wild New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides at natural foraging sites
TLDR
Two complementary lines of investigation provide the first quantitative description of larva fishing by wild crows in its full ecological context and evidence for tool selectivity by New Caledonian crows under natural conditions. Expand
The ecology of tool-use in the woodpecker finch (Cactospiza pallida)
TLDR
The data suggest that tool-use in the woodpecker finch has evolved in response to the dry and the wet seasons, and enabled the birds to reach particularly large and otherwise inaccessible prey hidden in tree-holes. Expand
Tool Use by the New Caledonian Crow Corvus moneduloides to Obtain Cerambycidae from Dead Wood
TLDR
The first detailed description of New Caledonian Crows Corvus moneduloides using tools to extract larvae of an endemic Cerambycidae:Prioninae from dead wood is presented. Expand
Natural history of a tool-using behavior by wild chimpanzees in feeding upon wood-boring ants
Various aspects of the tool-using behavior of the chimpanzees of the Mahale Mountains, Tanzania are described: natural history of the prey, cognitive mapping, selection of tool materials, types ofExpand
Dietary responses to fruit scarcity of wild chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea: possible implications for ecological importance of tool use.
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  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1998
TLDR
It is suggested that the Bossou chimpanzees depend strongly on tools for their subsistence, which implies a possible function for tool technology in the evolution of the authors' human ancestors. Expand
Behavioural ecology: Tool manufacture by naive juvenile crows
TLDR
It is shown that hand-raised juvenile New Caledonian crows spontaneously manufacture and use tools, without any contact with adults of their species or any prior demonstration by humans. Expand
Why Do Dolphins Carry Sponges?
TLDR
It is suggested that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, indicate tradeoffs between ecological and social factors and constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission. Expand
Isotopic fractionation and turnover in captive Garden Warblers (Sylvia borin): implications for delineating dietary and migratory associations in wild passerines
TLDR
This work investigated patterns of isotopic discrimination between diet and blood and feathers of Garden Warblers raised on an isotopically homogeneous diet and then switched to one of two experimental diets, mealworms, elderberries and Sambucus niger. Expand
New Caledonian Crows drop candle-nuts onto rock from communally used forks on branches
TLDR
New behaviour associated with animals dropping objects from a height is reported: the placing of objects on a substrate to release them, and the repeated dropping of objects from the same release position in three-dimensional space by the use of forks in branches. Expand
Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the New Caledonian crow Corvus moneduloides, with notes on its behaviour and ecology
TLDR
Measurements showed that the New Caledonian Crows were sexually dimorphic in size (the males were larger but not in shape), and it was found that the crows lived in mixed-sex groups, which supports the hypothesis that these may be family groups. Expand
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