The East India Company “Interest” and the English Government, 1783-4

@article{Philips1937TheEI,
  title={The East India Company “Interest” and the English Government, 1783-4},
  author={Cyril Philips},
  journal={Transactions of the Royal Historical Society},
  year={1937},
  volume={20},
  pages={83 - 101}
}
  • C. Philips
  • Published 1 December 1937
  • History, Economics
  • Transactions of the Royal Historical Society
Thex period 1772–84 was the formative period of British Indian history. During these years Indian affairs were constantly before Parliament; the questions of the relation of the East India Company to the State, and of the home to the Indian administration were dealt with, and the system of government instituted in 1784 was not fundamentally changed until 1858. 
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