The Earliest Primates

@article{Valen1965TheEP,
  title={The Earliest Primates},
  author={L. V. Van Valen and R. E. Sloan},
  journal={Science},
  year={1965},
  volume={150},
  pages={743 - 745}
}
The known range of the Primates is extended down from the middle Paleocene to the early Paleocene and late Cretaceous by a new genus and two new species from Montana, Purgatorius unio and P. ceratops. These species approach condylarths and leptictid and erinaceoid insectivores in structure. Purgatorius is referred to a new subfamily, Purgatoriinae, of the Paromomyidae, but is probably not the stem primate. The fauna of Purgatory Hill indicates a late early Paleocene age. 
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Topics from this paper

Purgatorius, an Early Paromomyid Primate (Mammalia)
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Earliest Palaeocene purgatoriids and the initial radiation of stem primates
  • Highly Influenced
The oldest known primate skeleton and early haplorhine evolution
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References

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Cretaceous Mammals from Montana
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The following workers have also believed known or unknown purgatoriines to be ancestral to some later primates
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A paper giving fuller comparison with the other purgatoriine genera, and with other placentals