The Dutch Atlantic, 1600–1800 Expansion Without Empire

@inproceedings{Emmer2001TheDA,
  title={The Dutch Atlantic, 1600–1800 Expansion Without Empire},
  author={P. Emmer},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract The history of the Dutch Atlantic seems riddled with failures. Within fifty years of their conquest, the two most important Dutch colonies (in Brazil and in North America) were lost. In addition, the Dutch plantations in the Caribbean suffered severe financial setbacks, bringing the Dutch slave trade to a virtual standstill. In this contribution the author asserts that even without these disasters, the Dutch could not have rivalled the British, as the Dutch did not have sufficient… Expand
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iii Author Biography v Acknowledgments vi