The Dunning-Kruger effect is (mostly) a statistical artefact: Valid approaches to testing the hypothesis with individual differences data

@article{Gignac2020TheDE,
  title={The Dunning-Kruger effect is (mostly) a statistical artefact: Valid approaches to testing the hypothesis with individual differences data},
  author={Gilles E. Gignac and Marcin Zajenkowski},
  journal={Intelligence},
  year={2020},
  volume={80},
  pages={101449}
}

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