The Dunning–Kruger Effect

@inproceedings{Dunning2011TheDE,
  title={The Dunning–Kruger Effect},
  author={D. Dunning},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract In this chapter, I provide argument and evidence that the scope of people's ignorance is often invisible to them. This meta-ignorance (or ignorance of ignorance) arises because lack of expertise and knowledge often hides in the realm of the “unknown unknowns” or is disguised by erroneous beliefs and background knowledge that only appear to be sufficient to conclude a right answer. As empirical evidence of meta-ignorance, I describe the Dunning–Kruger effect, in which poor performers in… Expand
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