The Double Burden of and Negative Spillover Between Paid and Domestic Work: Associations with Health Among Men and Women

@article{Vaananen2004TheDB,
  title={The Double Burden of and Negative Spillover Between Paid and Domestic Work: Associations with Health Among Men and Women},
  author={A Väänänen and May V. Kevin and Leena Ala-Mursula and Jaana Pentti and Mika Kivim{\"a}ki and Jussi Vahtera},
  journal={Women \& Health},
  year={2004},
  volume={40},
  pages={1 - 18}
}
ABSTRACT The objective of the study was to determine whether the double burden of and negative spillover between domestic and full-time paid work are associated with an increase in health problems. Survey responses were linked with sickness absence records in a cross-sectional study of 6442 full-time municipal employees. Women and men experiencing severe work-family spillover had a 1.5–1.6 (95% confidence intervals 1.1 to 2.0) times higher rate of sickness absence than those with no such… 
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