The Domestication of Animals

@article{Zeder2012TheDO,
  title={The Domestication of Animals},
  author={M. Zeder},
  journal={Journal of Anthropological Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={68},
  pages={161 - 190}
}
  • M. Zeder
  • Published 2012
  • Biology
  • Journal of Anthropological Research
  • Over the past 11,000 years humans have brought a wide variety of animals under domestication. Domestic animals belong to all Linnaean animal classes—mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects, and even, arguably, bacteria. Raised for food, secondary products, labor, and companionship, domestic animals have become intricately woven into human economy, society, and religion. Animal domestication is an on-going process, as humans, with increasingly sophisticated technology for breeding… CONTINUE READING
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