The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Post-Managed Care Era

@article{Alexander2006TheDR,
  title={The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Post-Managed Care Era},
  author={G. Caleb Alexander and John D. Lantos},
  journal={The American Journal of Bioethics},
  year={2006},
  volume={6},
  pages={29 - 32}
}
The growth of managed care was accompanied by concern about the impact that changes in health care organization would have on the doctor-patient relationship (DPR). We now are in a “post-managed care era,” where some of these changes in health care delivery have come to pass while others have not. A re-examination of the DPR in this setting suggests some surprising results. Rather than posing a new and unprecedented threat, managed care was simply the most recent of numerous strains on the DPR… Expand

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