The Dislike of Regular Plurals in Compounds: Phonological Familiarity or Morphological Constraint?

@article{Berent2007TheDO,
  title={The Dislike of Regular Plurals in Compounds: Phonological Familiarity or Morphological Constraint?},
  author={Iris Berent and Steven Pinker},
  journal={The Mental Lexicon},
  year={2007},
  volume={2},
  pages={129-181}
}
English speakers disfavor compounds containing regular plurals compared to irregular ones. Haskell, MacDonald and Seidenberg (2003) attribute this phenomenon to the rarity of compounds containing words with the phonological properties of regular plurals. Five experiments test this proposal. Experiment 1 demonstrated that novel regular plurals (e.g., loonks-eater) are disliked in compounds compared to irregular plurals with illicit (hence less frequent) phonological patterns (e.g., leevk-eater… 

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