The Disease and Adaptive Models of Addiction: A Framework Evaluation

@article{Alexander1987TheDA,
  title={The Disease and Adaptive Models of Addiction: A Framework Evaluation},
  author={Bruce K. Alexander},
  journal={Journal of Drug Issues},
  year={1987},
  volume={17},
  pages={47 - 66}
}
  • B. Alexander
  • Published 1 January 1987
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Drug Issues
Underlying a vast proliferation of theory, there are two fundamentally different views of addiction. The first conceptualizes addiction as an illness (disease model) and the second as a way of coping (adaptive model). From the vantage point of the modern history and philosophy of science, both models are better evaluated as “frameworks” than as empirically testable hypotheses. A “framework evaluation” reveals that both models provide a comprehensive, coherent analysis of addiction and both can… Expand
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