The Discovery of Motor Cortex and its Background

@article{Gross2007TheDO,
  title={The Discovery of Motor Cortex and its Background},
  author={Charles G. Gross},
  journal={Journal of the History of the Neurosciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={16},
  pages={320 - 331}
}
  • C. Gross
  • Published 10 July 2007
  • Biology
  • Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
In 1870 Gustav Fritsch and Edvard Hitzig showed that electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex of a dog produced movements. This was a crucial event in the development of modern neuroscience because it was the first good experimental evidence for a) cerebral cortex involvement in motor function, b) the electrical excitability of the cortex, c) topographic representation in the brain, and d) localization of function in different regions of the cerebral cortex. This paper discusses their… 
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Modern study of the neurophysiology of the cerebral cortex began with Fritsch and Hitzig's discovery that electrical stimulation of the cortex produces movements. The importance of this discovery was
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