The Disclosure Dilemma: Nuclear Intelligence and International Organizations

@article{Carnegie2019TheDD,
  title={The Disclosure Dilemma: Nuclear Intelligence and International Organizations},
  author={Allison Carnegie and Austin Carson},
  journal={Conflict Studies: Inter-State Conflict eJournal},
  year={2019}
}
Scholars have long argued that international organizations solve information problems through increased transparency. This article introduces a distinct problem that instead requires such institutions to keep information secret. We argue that states often seek to reveal intelligence about other states' violations of international rules and laws but are deterred by concerns about revealing the sources and methods used to collect it. Properly equipped international organizations, however, can… 

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