The Dioecious Amaranthus spp.: Here to Stay

@inproceedings{Steckel2007TheDA,
  title={The Dioecious Amaranthus spp.: Here to Stay},
  author={Lawrence E. Steckel},
  booktitle={Weed Technology},
  year={2007}
}
  • L. Steckel
  • Published in Weed Technology 1 April 2007
  • Biology
“Bid amaranthus all his beauty shed, And daffodils fill their cups with tears, To stew the laurate hearse where Lycid lies.” Paradise Lost, John Milton (1667) “Immortal amaranth, a flower which once In Paradise, fast by the Tree of Life, Began to bloom, but soon for Man's offence, To Heav'n remov'd, where first it grew, there grows, And flours aloft shading the Fount of Life.” Paradise Lost, John Milton (1667) “There are no fields of amaranth on this side of the grave” Imaginary Conversations… Expand
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Chemometric analysis of Amaranthus retroflexus in relation to livestock toxicity in southern Australia.
Amaranthus retroflexus L., an introduced invasive weed in southern Australia, has been associated with acute renal failure and/or mortality in a number of livestock species. While its leaves, flowersExpand
Distribution of glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus spp. in Nebraska.
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 46 REFERENCES
RECENT MIGRATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE DIOECIOUS AMARANTHS
TLDR
A group of ten related North American species, sharply set off from all other amaranths of the world by their dioecious habit are considered, more open to reconstruction than most of the genus because its distribution and heredity were less radically reshaped by ancient man. Expand
Amaranthus rudis and A. tuberculatus - one species or two?
TLDR
Waterhemps traditionally have been divided into two species, Amaranthus rudis and A. tuberculatus, but the distinctions break down for specimens collected from a major portion of the total waterhemp geographic range, so a single, polymorphic species of water hemp is proposed. Expand
Edible Wild Plants of the Prairie: An Ethnobotanical Guide
TLDR
By natural bacterial flora, Mosses, liverworts, and hornworts screened for antitumor agents, and development of endophytic Frankia sporangia in fieldand laboratory-grown nodules of Comptonia peregrina and Myrica gale. Expand
Biotypes of palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis) are resistant to imazetherapyr and thifensulfuron
TLDR
The occurrence of resistance at the Clay County site (Palmer amaranth) fit the typical pattern for the development of herbicide resistance, i.e., multiple applications of the same class of herbicides for several years, however, the Douglas County site had a limited history of use of ALS-inhibiting herbicides and did not follow typical models of resistance development. Expand
Promiscuity in weedy amaranths: high frequency of female tall waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus) × smooth pigweed (A. hybridus) hybridization under field conditions
TLDR
Observed sexual segregation was consistent with previously postulated chromosomal XY-type system in tall waterhemp sex determination, where males are the heterogametic sex. Expand
Transmission of herbicide resistance from a monoecious to a dioecious weedy Amaranthus species
TLDR
It is demonstrated that herbicide resistance can be acquired by A. rudis through a hybridization event with A. hybridus, and the resistance allele was subsequently transmitted to and conferred herbicides resistance in 39 of 110 plants analyzed from four BC2 families. Expand
TRANSFERAL OF HERBICIDE RESISTANCE TRAITS FROM AMARANTHUS PALMERI TO AMARANTHUS RUDIS
TLDR
Offspring of hybrid plants, backcrossed to the susceptible parent, survived herbicide treatment, demonstrating that herbicide resistance was transferred between species. Expand
Growth analysis of four Amaranthus species
TLDR
Herbicide rate and timing recommendations for mixed populations of these weeds should be based on A. palmeri because of its high growth rates, and recent increases in species range and observed changes in weed community structure may be partially explained by the growth characteristics of A. Palmeri and A. albus. Expand
Toxic plants of North America.
TLDR
Although the text is dense and detailed, helpful listings in the side margins of each page are included so that at a quick glance the reader can see a drawing of the plant, a map of its distribution, a listing of the problematic species, an indication of what plant parts are involved, a summary of the symptoms, and a list of the toxic compounds. Expand
Interference of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), Palmer amaranth (A. palmeri), and common waterhemp (A. rudis) in soybean
TLDR
The effect of weed density on soybean yield loss, pigweed biomass, and pigweed seed production were described using a rectangular hyperbola model and the relative ranking of the pigweed species biomass was Palmer amaranth > common waterhemp > redroot pigweed. Expand
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