The Dilemma of Case Studies Resolved: The Virtues of Using Case Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science

@article{Burian2001TheDO,
  title={The Dilemma of Case Studies Resolved: The Virtues of Using Case Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science},
  author={R. Burian},
  journal={Perspectives on Science},
  year={2001},
  volume={9},
  pages={383-404}
}
  • R. Burian
  • Published 2001
  • Sociology
  • Perspectives on Science
Philosophers of science turned to historical case studies in part in response to Thomas Kuhn's insistence that such studies can transform the philosophy of science. In this issue Joseph Pitt argues that the power of case studies to instruct us about scientific methodology and epistemology depends on prior philosophical commitments, without which case studies are not philosophically useful. Here I reply to Pitt, demonstrating that case studies, properly deployed, illustrate styles of scientific… Expand
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