The Development of Mastery and Race in the Comprehensive Slave Codes of the Greater Caribbean during the Seventeenth Century

@article{Rugemer2013TheDO,
  title={The Development of Mastery and Race in the Comprehensive Slave Codes of the Greater Caribbean during the Seventeenth Century},
  author={Edward Bartlett Rugemer},
  journal={William and Mary Quarterly},
  year={2013},
  volume={70},
  pages={429}
}
http://www.jstor.org The Development of Mastery and Race in the Comprehensive Slave Codes of the Greater Caribbean during the Seventeenth Century Author(s): Edward B. Rugemer Source: The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (July 2013), pp. 429-458 Published by: Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5309/willmaryquar.70.3.0429 Accessed: 30-09-2015 15:31 UTC 
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