The Development of Infant Memory

@article{RoveeCollier1999TheDO,
  title={The Development of Infant Memory},
  author={C. Rovee-Collier},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={1999},
  volume={8},
  pages={80 - 85}
}
  • C. Rovee-Collier
  • Published 1999
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Over the first year and a half of life, the duration of memory becomes progressively longer, the specificity of the cues required for recognition progressively decreases after short test delays, and the latency of priming progressively decreases to the adult level. The memory dissociations of very young infants on recognition and priming tasks, which presumably tap different memory systems, are also identical to those of adults. These parallels suggest that both memory systems are present very… Expand

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