The Death of Alexander the Great – A Spinal Twist of Fate

@article{Ashrafian2004TheDO,
  title={The Death of Alexander the Great – A Spinal Twist of Fate},
  author={H. Ashrafian},
  journal={Journal of the History of the Neurosciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={138 - 142}
}
  • H. Ashrafian
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C. from an unknown cause. Physical depictions of this historical figure reveal the likelihood of a cervical scoliotic deformity. This is substantiated with the medical history and is correlated with his untimely death. For the first time, it is concluded that Alexander’s death may have ensued from the sequelae of a congenital scoliotic syndrome. 
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