The Danish Royal Law of 1665

@article{Ekman1957TheDR,
  title={The Danish Royal Law of 1665},
  author={Ernst Ekman},
  journal={The Journal of Modern History},
  year={1957},
  volume={29},
  pages={102 - 107}
}
  • E. Ekman
  • Published 1 June 1957
  • History
  • The Journal of Modern History
ONE of the most interesting and important political or legal documents of the seventeenth century is the Danish Royal Law or Kongelov of 1665. It is an order of succession and, at the same time, a constitution that established a system of royal absolutism which remained in force until the June Constitution of 1849. At the present time, therefore, it is still the longest-lasting written constitution in modern history. What had happened in Denmark to bring about a radical constitutional change… 
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