The Cursing Practice in Sri Lanka as a Religious Channel for Keeping Physical Violence in Control

@article{Feddema1997TheCP,
  title={The Cursing Practice in Sri Lanka as a Religious Channel for Keeping Physical Violence in Control},
  author={J. P. Feddema},
  journal={Journal of Asian and African Studies},
  year={1997},
  volume={32},
  pages={202 - 222}
}
  • J. P. Feddema
  • Published 1997
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Asian and African Studies
This study deals with the cursing services in Sinhala Buddhism in Sri Lanka which some gods offer to the people. The author, who is using the mimesis and scapegoat mechanism theory of Girard as a point of reference, concentrates on the god Devol in the hamlet of Seenigama on the south-west coast. Why do people ask gods to harm or even kill their adversaries? Why is cursing on the increase in the country, and how does Buddhism, a religion preaching ahimsa (non-violence), cope with the cursing… Expand
The Social Significance of Curse Tablets in the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire
The use of curse tablets was an important method for ancient people to cope with life, as shown by the increasing number of tablets found across the Graeco-Roman world. They could address a varietyExpand

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