The Currency and Tempo of Extinction

@article{Regan2001TheCA,
  title={The Currency and Tempo of Extinction},
  author={Helen M. Regan and Richard Lupia and Andrew N. Drinnan and Mark A. Burgman},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2001},
  volume={157},
  pages={1 - 10}
}
This study examines estimates of extinction rates for the current purported biotic crisis and from the fossil record. Studies that compare current and geological extinctions sometimes use metrics that confound different sources of error and reflect different features of extinction processes. The per taxon extinction rate is a standard measure in paleontology that avoids some of the pitfalls of alternative approaches. Extinction rates reported in the conservation literature are rarely… Expand
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