The Cream of the Crop? Geography, Networks, and Irish Migrant Selection in the Age of Mass Migration

@article{Connor2019TheCO,
  title={The Cream of the Crop? Geography, Networks, and Irish Migrant Selection in the Age of Mass Migration},
  author={Dylan Shane Connor},
  journal={The Journal of Economic History},
  year={2019},
  volume={79},
  pages={139 - 175}
}
  • D. Connor
  • Published 2019
  • Geography
  • The Journal of Economic History
With more than 30 million people moving to North America during the Age of Mass Migration (1850–1913), governments feared that Europe was losing its most talented workers. Using new data from Ireland in the early twentieth century, I provide evidence to the contrary, showing that the sons of farmers and illiterate men were more likely to emigrate than their literate and skilled counterparts. Emigration rates were highest in poorer farming communities with stronger migrant networks. I… Expand
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