The Course of Postpartum Depression: A Review of Longitudinal Studies

@article{Vliegen2014TheCO,
  title={The Course of Postpartum Depression: A Review of Longitudinal Studies},
  author={Nicole Vliegen and Sara Casalin and Patrick Luyten},
  journal={Harvard Review of Psychiatry},
  year={2014},
  volume={22},
  pages={1–22}
}
Learning Objectives: After participating in this educational activity, the physician should be better able to1. Identify the risk factors associated with persistence of postpartum depression.2. Evaluate the limitations of the literature.3. Determine the implications of the findings on women with postpartum depression and their children.This article aims to critically review studies published between 1985 and 2012 concerning the course of postpartum depression (PPD), as well as factors… Expand
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  • 2018
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Results confirmed findings of an earlier meta-analysis and in addition revealed four new predictors of postpartum depression: self-esteem, marital status, socioeconomic status, and unplanned/unwanted pregnancy. Expand
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