The Cost of Color: Skin Color, Discrimination, and Health among African-Americans.

@article{Monk2015TheCO,
  title={The Cost of Color: Skin Color, Discrimination, and Health among African-Americans.},
  author={Ellis P. Monk},
  journal={AJS; American journal of sociology},
  year={2015},
  volume={121 2},
  pages={
          396-444
        }
}
  • Ellis P. Monk
  • Published 2015
  • Medicine
  • AJS; American journal of sociology
  • In this study, the author uses a nationally representative survey to examine the relationship(s) between skin tone, discrimination, and health among African-Americans. He finds that skin tone is a significant predictor of multiple forms of perceived discrimination (including perceived skin color discrimination from whites and blacks) and, in turn, these forms of perceived discrimination are significant predictors of key health outcomes, such as depression and self-rated mental and physical… CONTINUE READING

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