The Contribution of Archery to the Turkish Conquest of Anatolia

@article{Kaegi1964TheCO,
  title={The Contribution of Archery to the Turkish Conquest of Anatolia},
  author={Walter Emil Kaegi},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={1964},
  volume={39},
  pages={96 - 108}
}
  • W. Kaegi
  • Published 1 January 1964
  • History
  • Speculum
ONE of the most important asks for Byzantine historians is the explanation of the Byzantine loss of Anatolia to the Seljuk Turks in the second half of the eleventh century. In 1050 the peninsula seemed to be the firm keystone of the Byzantine Empire; the Byzantines had been defending it successfully against the Arabs since the seventh century. By the accession of Alexius Comnenus to the emperorship in 1081 the Seljuks had overrun most of Anatolia. The apparent ease and rapidity of this Seljuk… 
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