The Consequences of Industrialization: Evidence from Water Pollution and Digestive Cancers in China

@article{Ebenstein2012TheCO,
  title={The Consequences of Industrialization: Evidence from Water Pollution and Digestive Cancers in China},
  author={Avraham Yehuda Ebenstein},
  journal={Review of Economics and Statistics},
  year={2012},
  volume={94},
  pages={186-201}
}
  • A. Ebenstein
  • Published 2012
  • Geography
  • Review of Economics and Statistics
Abstract China's rapid industrialization has led to a severe deterioration in water quality in the country's lakes and rivers. By exploiting variation in pollution across China's river basins, I estimate that a deterioration of water quality by a single grade (on a six-grade scale) increases the digestive cancer death rate by 9.7%. The analysis rules out other potential explanations such as smoking rates, dietary patterns, and air pollution. I estimate that doubling China's levy rates for… Expand
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