The Consequences of Brood Size for Breeding Blue Tits. Iii. Measuring the Cost of Reproduction: Survival, Future Fecundity, and Differential Dispersal.

@article{Nur1988TheCO,
  title={The Consequences of Brood Size for Breeding Blue Tits. Iii. Measuring the Cost of Reproduction: Survival, Future Fecundity, and Differential Dispersal.},
  author={Nadav Nur},
  journal={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={1988},
  volume={42 2},
  pages={351-362}
}
To determine how the cost of reproduction varies with brood size, a population of blue tits (Parus caeruleus) breeding in Wytham Wood, England, was manipulated over a three year period. Two hundred sixteen pairs were randomly assigned 3, 6, 9, 12, or 15 nestlings; nestlings were exchanged soon after hatching. Survival of adult females (as measured by the proportion recaptured in the following winter and/or spring) declined significantly with increasing brood size in two out of three years… CONTINUE READING

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