The Congress for Cultural Freedom, the End of Ideology and the 1955 Milan Conference: `Defining the Parameters of Discourse'1

@article{ScottSmith2002TheCF,
  title={The Congress for Cultural Freedom, the End of Ideology and the 1955 Milan Conference: `Defining the Parameters of Discourse'1},
  author={G. Scott-Smith},
  journal={Journal of Contemporary History},
  year={2002},
  volume={37},
  pages={437 - 455}
}
  • G. Scott-Smith
  • Published 2002
  • History
  • Journal of Contemporary History
  • The Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF), an institution that fostered an international anti-communist consensus amongst intellectuals during the Cold War, represents a fascinating meeting-point between politics and culture, or, more broadly, between power and ideals.3 In particular, its links with the CIA have led some observers to disparage it as little more than a tool of US foreign policy, its intellectual-cultural interests being regarded as a smokescreen for an underlying 'politics of… CONTINUE READING

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    317-23; Hochgeschwender, op. cit., 453, 477. 63 'It was no longer exciting.' Thomas W. Braden, telephone interview
      Reluctant Columbuses in Milan
        Shils also acknowledged these 'material hindrances' but did not think they affected the overall value of the conference. Shils