The Comparative Safety of Legal Induced Abortion and Childbirth in the United States

@article{Raymond2012TheCS,
  title={The Comparative Safety of Legal Induced Abortion and Childbirth in the United States},
  author={Elizabeth G. Raymond and David A. Grimes},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={119},
  pages={215–219}
}
OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of abortion compared with childbirth. METHODS: We estimated mortality rates associated with live births and legal induced abortions in the United States in 1998–2005. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System, birth certificates, and Guttmacher Institute surveys. In addition, we searched for population-based data comparing the morbidity of abortion and childbirth. RESULTS: The pregnancy-associated… 

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