The Cold-Water Connection: Bergmann’s Rule in North American Freshwater Fishes

@article{Rypel2013TheCC,
  title={The Cold-Water Connection: Bergmann’s Rule in North American Freshwater Fishes},
  author={Andrew L. Rypel},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2013},
  volume={183},
  pages={147 - 156}
}
  • A. Rypel
  • Published 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American Naturalist
Understanding general rules governing macroecological body size variations is one of the oldest pursuits in ecology. However, this science has been dominated by studies of terrestrial vertebrates, spurring debate over the validity of such rules in other taxonomic groups. Here, relationships between maximum body size and latitude, temperature, and elevation were evaluated for 29 North American freshwater fish species. Bergmann’s rule (i.e., that body size correlates positively with latitude and… Expand
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